Behavior

Not everyone can be an excellent educator. It takes a special kind of person to genuinely love a child like they are your own, because that is truly what it takes.

Social-Emotional Learning

As the new school year kicks off, students arrive to newly decorated classrooms and (mostly) refreshed and reenergized educators approaching yet another new year armed with new ideas and the optimism only a new school year can bring! “It’s going to be a great year, our best year yet!” we all whisper to ourselves believing that the lessons learned from past classes paired with the information we gained from books and seminars over the summer will be the true difference makers we hope they’ll be! And we’re right on many levels. Things will be different, better, and more student-focused. However, each year, like a mother forgets the pain of childbirth, we, teachers and school staff, forget the physical and mental fatigue that inevitably comes with doing this job well. Alas, it is my suggestion that part of our strategic plan this year from school boards and superintendents to building administrators, teachers, and paraprofessionals includes a preventative plan to ensure we care for ourselves, for one another, and strive to protect school staff’s mental health and prevent burnout. In this post, we will walk through how education has changed, why support is needed, and how both administrators and educators can help.

Social-Emotional Learning

As adults, we have learned how to deal with emotions and feelings in a rational way. This is something that is learned. When it comes to children, they may not yet know how to deal with stressful situations. Stress may be caused by their background and home situations which can include domestic violence, poverty, abuse, drug use, alcoholism, and other challenges. It may also be triggered by situations at school which overwhelm them or cause intense emotions. Children such as these need to learn how to self-regulate themselves, and this is where a comfort room comes into play. How to create a comfort room in schools is a much debated topic, but we will focus on some of the aspects to look at in creating one.

Social-Emotional Learning

Everyone experiences trauma of various degrees during their lifetime and how we cope with them can depend on the severity of the trauma and the support given thereafter. Childhood trauma is often misunderstood or overlooked in a belief that since the child is young, they will either not remember the trauma or not understand what has occurred and so be less affected by this. This can result in trauma related disorders that can affect them in a myriad of ways as they mature.

Social-Emotional Learning

Trauma Informed Schools

Children with histories of trauma face academic, behavioral, and relational challenges. Often, these students have poor academic performance, drop out of school, or end up in alternative education settings. Students have diverse backgrounds, and some are exposed to traumatic factors.

What is a trauma informed school? It is a setting where trauma is understood, recognized, and responded to in ways that empower those who are affected. The goal of trauma informed schools is to put in place supports that help children cope. Read this article to learn more.

Social-Emotional Learning

Mindfulness in Schools – Relaxation and Awareness

What is mindfulness? Mindfulness is a technique or practice of being aware of each moment and creating a relaxed state of mind. When applied in schools, mindfulness can increase children’s self-confidence and performance in class.

The goal is to become more aware of thoughts and feelings. You do this in a non-judgmental way, so instead of being overwhelmed, you’ll be able to manage them better. The technique also involves breathing exercises commonly used in meditation or yoga. If this sounds vague to you, read this article to gain a better understanding of mindfulness.