Social-Emotional Learning

School faculty members know a range of techniques for helping to support the educational needs of their students, but what about the social-emotional needs? Far too many students are struggling with social-emotional needs, yet teachers are unaware or uncertain of how to handle them. Often, these students can be severely withdrawn from their peers or they can have a hard time following the rules and procedures of the classroom. So how can we identify and support students with social-emotional needs?

Social-Emotional Learning

The holiday season is filled with expectations of joy, excitement, and happiness. But while it’s a very happy time for many, it can be a difficult time for some, exacerbating feelings of anxiety and depression. Many students, particularly those in poverty and those who have experienced loss or trauma, struggle emotionally during the holiday season. This shows up in their behavior at school, either through outbursts, aggressive behavior, being withdrawn, sad, or angry. In this post, we will give teachers some tips on how to help students emotionally through the holiday season.

Social-Emotional Learning

As adults, we have learned how to deal with emotions and feelings in a rational way. This is something that is learned. When it comes to children, they may not yet know how to deal with stressful situations. Stress may be caused by their background and home situations which can include domestic violence, poverty, abuse, drug use, alcoholism, and other challenges. It may also be triggered by situations at school which overwhelm them or cause intense emotions. Children such as these need to learn how to self-regulate themselves, and this is where a comfort room comes into play. How to create a comfort room in schools is a much debated topic, but we will focus on some of the aspects to look at in creating one.

Social-Emotional Learning

Mental Health in Schools – The Challenges Faced and Strategies to Tackle Them

With children spending much of their time in school, there’s a greater role and responsibility that rest on educators to look out for students’ mental health and welfare. Today, mental health in schools matters more than ever, and principals and teachers should be at the forefront to address this issue.