Social-Emotional Learning

As I’ve pondered these points and worked with others creating plans for their schools, I have seen a lot of resources focused on trying to get back on track. Then today, I watched Becoming on Netflix and heard Michelle Obama speak about her transition to the White House. She was asked how she got her life back on track during or after the transition and she replied, “It’s not getting back on track, but it’s creating my next track.” Of course! For years, we have been talking about the paradigm shift from traditional to trauma informed or healing centered engagement. We have been training for this and studying it and it is time to go full force in creating that track. But, how? Here are 6 tips for a healing re-entry plan for schools.

Social-Emotional Learning

As adults, we have learned how to deal with emotions and feelings in a rational way. This is something that is learned. When it comes to children, they may not yet know how to deal with stressful situations. Stress may be caused by their background and home situations which can include domestic violence, poverty, abuse, drug use, alcoholism, and other challenges. It may also be triggered by situations at school which overwhelm them or cause intense emotions. Children such as these need to learn how to self-regulate themselves, and this is where a comfort room comes into play. How to create a comfort room in schools is a much debated topic, but we will focus on some of the aspects to look at in creating one.

BehaviorLeadership

Here at INcompassing Education, we believe that building a positive school culture and school climate largely depends on the quality of relationships. It requires consistency and commitment from administrators, teachers, and students. Through professional development and educational consulting, we can help struggling schools turn things around.